How We Read the Bible

According to recent research conducted by the Barna Group commissioned by the American Bible Society, American Bible readers strongly prefer reading the Bible in an old fashioned printed edition of the Bible.  The preferred formats are print - 84%, digital - 10%, audio - 5%, and all others - 1%. So What? A few months ago I blogged about the tremendous rise in e-reading.  While the report does note a shift toward digital reading the shift is far slower when it comes to the Bible Read More …

Print Media Costs How Much?

Without giving away my age, I will admit that when I started out in ministry print media was at the center of the church communications world.  Nearly everything deemed worth communicating was printed.  Anything of real significance was communicated through a variety of print pieces usually including a specialty piece (brochure, postcard, etc.) and mentions in the big two (weekly worship bulletin and monthly newsletter).  While websites did exist, they certainly were not a central part of a Read More …

Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology

The Center on Media and Human Development in the School of Communication at Northwestern University recently published "Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology: A National Survey," which highlights ten key findings.  This list includes: parents still turn to family and friends for parenting advice far more often than to new media sources like websites, blogs, and social networks, parents do not report having many family conflicts or concerns about their children’s media use, Read More …

Church Marketing Shifts

Lindsay Christian's recent Capital Times article, "Marketing God: Churches Turn to the Web, Social Media to Attract Members," explores how many congregations in her area have shifted their marketing time and monies from print efforts to online endeavors. Christian's piece effectively explores how a significant trend has impacted congregations in her community. To highlight the significantly diminished return on investment and increasing irrelevancy of print advertising (especially with Read More …

Considerable Complexity – Social Marketing

Many congregations are rethinking how they spend their limited marketing/advertising dollars.  In most cases less and less money is allocated for print (phone book, direct mail, etc.) in order to free up additional funds for new media.  While this shift seems logical, the next steps are far less clear.  One of the troublesome aspects of entering this new arena is the considerable complexity of social marketing.  The graphic below, from Buddy Media, illustrates this quite well. So Read More …