Church Website Reality Check

Recently Adam McLane, a Partner at The Youth Cartel and Principal at McLane Creative, wrote about his experience visiting more than 1,000 church websites.  Being completely frank, McLane notes that many sites suck and are "truly crappy." Since your congregation's website is a key way potential newcomers gather data and determine whether or not to participate, it should accurately reflect your congregation's identity.  Not only should the site be aesthetically pleasing, but it should be up to Read More …

Ministry Job Musts

Adam McLane, a Partner at The Youth Cartel and Principal at McLane Creative, recently blogged about two things  youth ministers needs to consider in order to retain their current employment: metrics/measurables and donor relations.  Speaking bluntly he suggests that by managing these two areas well one can eliminate "90% of the reasons my friends have gotten fired." So What? Like any type of employment, ministry positions involve (or, at least should involve) periodic evaluation.  The Read More …

Social Media Interaction with Students

Earlier this week Slant33, a part of Barefoot Ministries, posted the responses of three youth ministry experts to the question: "Where do you draw the line on social media interaction with students? Why?"  The responses vary widely: D. Scott Miller, director of the Division of Youth and Young Adult Ministry of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, has a personal policy to never friend anyone under the age of eighteen on Facebook.  Additionally, he believes this is the best policy for all Read More …

The Priesthood of Believers NOT of Staff

Adam McLane of Youth Specialties recently blogged about an all too common functional reality: the priesthood of the believers being in embraced in theory, but not in practice.  He writes: Most people on church staff have no idea how to turn the reigns of their ministry over to the church. It seems counter-productive to lead without holding the reigns. The attitude is generally that church staff are the experts, seminary trained, denominationally ordained and battle-experienced to do the work. Read More …